Effects of Ethyl Alcohol on the Contralateral and Ipsilateral Acoustic Reflex Threshold Contralateral and ipsilateral acoustic reflex thresholds were measured in response to 500-, 1000-, and 2000-Hz pure tones after the ingestion of a 50% alcohol solution. Acoustic reflex threshold measurements were obtained preingestion and at blood-alcohol concentrations of 0.03 to 0.10% in 0.01% increments. A linear relationship existed between acoustic reflex ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1979
Effects of Ethyl Alcohol on the Contralateral and Ipsilateral Acoustic Reflex Threshold
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Edward N. Cohill
    Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio
  • Herbert J. Greenberg
    Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1979
Effects of Ethyl Alcohol on the Contralateral and Ipsilateral Acoustic Reflex Threshold
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1979, Vol. 22, 289-294. doi:10.1044/jshr.2202.289
History: Received June 7, 1978 , Accepted August 24, 1978
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1979, Vol. 22, 289-294. doi:10.1044/jshr.2202.289
History: Received June 7, 1978; Accepted August 24, 1978

Contralateral and ipsilateral acoustic reflex thresholds were measured in response to 500-, 1000-, and 2000-Hz pure tones after the ingestion of a 50% alcohol solution. Acoustic reflex threshold measurements were obtained preingestion and at blood-alcohol concentrations of 0.03 to 0.10% in 0.01% increments. A linear relationship existed between acoustic reflex threshold and blood-alcohol concentration, with the greatest shift at 0.10% being 11 dB for contralateral stimulation and 7 dB for ipsilateral. No frequency effects were found. Results can be explained by the anatomical differences in the contralateral and ipsilateral pathways.

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