Evidence for Left Hemisphere Superiority in Processing Movement-Related Tonal Signals A pursuit auditory tracking (PAT) paradigm was used to investigate asymmetric hemispheric processing and control for a sensorimotor task analogous to speech. In PAT subjects match a continuously varying target tone (ranging from 100 Hz to 2 kHz) presented to one ear with a qualitatively similar second tone (the cursor) ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1979
Evidence for Left Hemisphere Superiority in Processing Movement-Related Tonal Signals
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Harvey M. Sussman
    University of Texas, Austin
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1979
Evidence for Left Hemisphere Superiority in Processing Movement-Related Tonal Signals
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1979, Vol. 22, 224-235. doi:10.1044/jshr.2202.224
History: Received April 24, 1978 , Accepted August 30, 1978
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1979, Vol. 22, 224-235. doi:10.1044/jshr.2202.224
History: Received April 24, 1978; Accepted August 30, 1978

A pursuit auditory tracking (PAT) paradigm was used to investigate asymmetric hemispheric processing and control for a sensorimotor task analogous to speech. In PAT subjects match a continuously varying target tone (ranging from 100 Hz to 2 kHz) presented to one ear with a qualitatively similar second tone (the cursor) presented to the other ear and controlled by mandibular elevation and depression movements. Twenty right-handed subjects were given the standard dichotic mode of counterbalanced target/cursor signal presentations. Another group of 16 right-handed subjects underwent, after extensive task familiarization, tracking with only the target signal presented in counterbalanced order to one ear at a time with white noise presented to the other ear. The results of the standard tracking group replicated past studies showing a statistically significant tracking advantage in favor of cursor/right ear presentations. The No-Cursor group showed a significant target/right ear advantage. These results are discussed with reference to two theoretical hypotheses to explain the tracking laterality effect—a division-of-labor hypothesis and a sensorimotor integration hypothesis.

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