A Comparison of Covert and Overt Assessment Procedures in Stuttering Therapy Outcome Evaluation This study aimed to compare covert and overt assessments in outcome evaluation of an adult stuttering therapy program. Three situations (talking with strangers, with familiars, and on the telephone) in which nine subjects attained fluency within the therapy program were used to evaluate speech behavior three months and six months ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1975
A Comparison of Covert and Overt Assessment Procedures in Stuttering Therapy Outcome Evaluation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roger J. Ingham
    New South Wales College Paramedical Studies, Sydney, Australia
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1975
A Comparison of Covert and Overt Assessment Procedures in Stuttering Therapy Outcome Evaluation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1975, Vol. 18, 346-354. doi:10.1044/jshr.1802.346
History: Received September 4, 1973 , Accepted May 1, 1974
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1975, Vol. 18, 346-354. doi:10.1044/jshr.1802.346
History: Received September 4, 1973; Accepted May 1, 1974

This study aimed to compare covert and overt assessments in outcome evaluation of an adult stuttering therapy program. Three situations (talking with strangers, with familiars, and on the telephone) in which nine subjects attained fluency within the therapy program were used to evaluate speech behavior three months and six months after treatment. In each situation, an overt and covert recording was made of each subject’s speech behavior. Percentage of stuttered syllables spoken and rate of speech of the group showed changes that were associated with the difference in assessment conditions. At three months after treatment, there was a small but significant increase in stuttering and reduction in speech rate during the covert condition. At six months this trend remained although differences in percentage syllables stuttered under both conditions were not significant. The findings suggested that, for some subjects, fluency attained under overtly recorded conditions may be illusory and, by implication, could give a false impression of the efficacy of therapy.

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