Conjoined Structures in the Language of Deaf Students Approximately 450 deaf students (age 10 to 18 years) and 60 hearing children (age eight to 10 years) judged the grammaticality of unreduced and reduced conjoined structures formed by using and, and demonstrated their ability to produce conjoined structures by combining sentences that permitted the application of conjunction reduction as ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1975
Conjoined Structures in the Language of Deaf Students
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • R. B. Wilbur
    University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
  • S. P. Quigley
    University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
  • D. S. Montanelli
    University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1975
Conjoined Structures in the Language of Deaf Students
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1975, Vol. 18, 319-335. doi:10.1044/jshr.1802.319
History: Received May 6, 1974 , Accepted September 6, 1974
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1975, Vol. 18, 319-335. doi:10.1044/jshr.1802.319
History: Received May 6, 1974; Accepted September 6, 1974

Approximately 450 deaf students (age 10 to 18 years) and 60 hearing children (age eight to 10 years) judged the grammaticality of unreduced and reduced conjoined structures formed by using and, and demonstrated their ability to produce conjoined structures by combining sentences that permitted the application of conjunction reduction as well as sentence conjoining. The tasks included several types of deviant conjoined structures commonly found in the written language of deaf persons. The results indicated that grammaticality judgments increased with age and that judgments were approximately equal for reduced and unreduced conjoined structures. Production of conjoined structures was more difficult than judgments of grammaticality. An order of difficulty for deaf students in producing conjoined subjects, conjoined objects, and conjoined verb phrases was shown to exist. While there was a pattern of general retardation of development of syntactic structures for deaf subjects as compared to hearing subjects, several specific syntactic deviations were found to be peculiar to the language of the deaf subjects and to be resistant to improvement with age.

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