Infant Sucking Response Patterns as a Conjugate Function of Changes in the Sound Pressure Level of Auditory Stimuli The purpose of this study was to evaluate a procedure for testing the auditory capabilities of neonates. A schematic circuit diagram of an electronic pressure nipple (pacifier) is presented. This nipple can be used to replace the hand-held switch of the Bekesy-type audiometer or be used with any motor-driven recording ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1975
Infant Sucking Response Patterns as a Conjugate Function of Changes in the Sound Pressure Level of Auditory Stimuli
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • W. Alan Eisele
    Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Richard C. Berry
    Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Thomas H. Shriner
    University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1975
Infant Sucking Response Patterns as a Conjugate Function of Changes in the Sound Pressure Level of Auditory Stimuli
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1975, Vol. 18, 296-307. doi:10.1044/jshr.1802.296
History: Received August 1, 1974 , Accepted January 25, 1975
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1975, Vol. 18, 296-307. doi:10.1044/jshr.1802.296
History: Received August 1, 1974; Accepted January 25, 1975

The purpose of this study was to evaluate a procedure for testing the auditory capabilities of neonates. A schematic circuit diagram of an electronic pressure nipple (pacifier) is presented. This nipple can be used to replace the hand-held switch of the Bekesy-type audiometer or be used with any motor-driven recording attenuator. Through use of the Bekesy E-800 audiometer, 100 of 105 neonates (mean age 52.8 hours) who were tested responded differentially for three pulsed tones, 1 k Hz, 2 k Hz, and 4 k Hz (sound field). Mean response levels obtained for the 100 infants who responded were 1 k Hz = 59.2 dB; 2 k Hz = 62.0 dB; and 4 k Hz = 67.7 dB (SPL). These levels were found to be significantly different (p < 0.005) from one another. Test-retest reliability was high (no r < 0.75). The system described in this report provides an index of auditory sensitivity in neonates. It is concluded that this technique shows great promise for identification auditometry with the neonate.

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