Patterns of Language Behavior in Children with Developmental Language Disorders Tests to measure comprehension, formulation, and repetition of certain phonologic, syntactic, and semantic aspects of language were administered to 47 children who had developmental language disorders. A factor analysis of the resultant scores indicated that three factors were present in the data. These factors are presented as six patterns of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1975
Patterns of Language Behavior in Children with Developmental Language Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dorothy M. Aram
    Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
  • James E. Nation
    Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1975
Patterns of Language Behavior in Children with Developmental Language Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1975, Vol. 18, 229-241. doi:10.1044/jshr.1802.229
History: Received April 25, 1973 , Accepted December 17, 1974
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1975, Vol. 18, 229-241. doi:10.1044/jshr.1802.229
History: Received April 25, 1973; Accepted December 17, 1974

Tests to measure comprehension, formulation, and repetition of certain phonologic, syntactic, and semantic aspects of language were administered to 47 children who had developmental language disorders. A factor analysis of the resultant scores indicated that three factors were present in the data. These factors are presented as six patterns of language performance, one for high loadings on the factor and one for low loadings. The six patterns are (1) repetition strength (Factor I, high); (2) nonspecific formulation-repetition deficit (Factor I, low); (3) generalized low performance (Factor II, high); (4) phonologic comprehension-formulation-repetition deficit (Factor II, low); (5) comprehension deficit (Factor III, high); and (6) formulation-repetition deficit (Factor III, low). Possible relations among these patterns and nonlinguistic measures (sex, race, age, nonverbal intelligence, socioeconomic status, and status of the peripheral speech mechanism) were investigated. Two of the patterns of language performance were found to be related significantly to age. On Factor II, the younger children tended to get high loadings (generalized low performance) while the older children tended to get low loadings (phonologic comprehension-formulation-repetition deficit).

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