Linguistic Performance of Hard-of-Hearing and Normal-Hearing Children A repetition task was employed to investigate syntactic patterns of hard-of-hearing children. The subjects were 11 students enrolled in public-school classes for the hard-of-hearing. A matching control group of normal-hearing children was selected from the same schools. It was found that both groups tended to use grammatical constructions rather than ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1974
Linguistic Performance of Hard-of-Hearing and Normal-Hearing Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph Wilcox
    Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
  • Henry Tobin
    Gallaudet College, Washington, D. C.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1974
Linguistic Performance of Hard-of-Hearing and Normal-Hearing Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1974, Vol. 17, 286-293. doi:10.1044/jshr.1702.286
History: Received April 9, 1973 , Accepted January 11, 1974
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1974, Vol. 17, 286-293. doi:10.1044/jshr.1702.286
History: Received April 9, 1973; Accepted January 11, 1974

A repetition task was employed to investigate syntactic patterns of hard-of-hearing children. The subjects were 11 students enrolled in public-school classes for the hard-of-hearing. A matching control group of normal-hearing children was selected from the same schools. It was found that both groups tended to use grammatical constructions rather than nongrammatical approximations. The hard-of-hearing group, however, achieved significantly lower means in each grammatical form tested, and tended to substitute simpler forms. This lower level of performance seemed to represent a difference of degree rather than kind, as the experimental group displayed linguistic performance similar to the control group but showed a general delay in language development.

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