Predicting Audiovisual Consonant Recognition Performance of Hearing-Impaired Adults The redundancy between the auditory and visual recognition of consonants was studied in 100 hearing-impaired subjects who demonstrated a wide range of speech-discrimination abilities. Twenty English consonants, recorded in CV combination with the vowel /a/, were presented to the subjects for auditory, visual, and audiovisual identification. There was relatively little ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1974
Predicting Audiovisual Consonant Recognition Performance of Hearing-Impaired Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brian E. Walden
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D. C.
  • Robert A. Prosek
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D. C.
  • Don W. Worthington
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D. C.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1974
Predicting Audiovisual Consonant Recognition Performance of Hearing-Impaired Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1974, Vol. 17, 270-278. doi:10.1044/jshr.1702.270
History: Received July 31, 1973 , Accepted February 1, 1974
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1974, Vol. 17, 270-278. doi:10.1044/jshr.1702.270
History: Received July 31, 1973; Accepted February 1, 1974

The redundancy between the auditory and visual recognition of consonants was studied in 100 hearing-impaired subjects who demonstrated a wide range of speech-discrimination abilities. Twenty English consonants, recorded in CV combination with the vowel /a/, were presented to the subjects for auditory, visual, and audiovisual identification. There was relatively little variation among subjects in the visual recognition of consonants. A measure of the expected degree of redundancy between an observer’s auditory and visual confusions among consonants was used in an effort to predict audiovisual consonant recognition ability. This redundancy measure was based on an information analysis of an observer’s auditory confusions among consonants and expressed the degree to which his auditory confusions fell within categories of visually homophenous consonants. The measure was found to have moderate predictive value in estimating an observer’s audiovisual consonant recognition score. These results suggest that the degree of redundancy between an observer’s auditory and visual confusions of speech elements is a determinant in the benefit that visual cues offer to that observer.

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