Pure-Tone Thresholds and Word-Recognition Abilities of Hearing-Impaired Children A recorded list of 25 spondaic words was administered monaurally through earphones to 72 hearing-impaired children to evaluate their comprehension of “easy” speech material. The subjects ranged in age from eight to 16 years, and their average pure-tone thresholds (500-1000-2000 Hz) ranged in level from 52 to 127 dB (ANSI, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1974
Pure-Tone Thresholds and Word-Recognition Abilities of Hearing-Impaired Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Norman P. Erber
    Central Institute for the Deaf, St. Louis, Missouri
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1974
Pure-Tone Thresholds and Word-Recognition Abilities of Hearing-Impaired Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1974, Vol. 17, 194-202. doi:10.1044/jshr.1702.194
History: Received June 18, 1973 , Accepted December 31, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1974, Vol. 17, 194-202. doi:10.1044/jshr.1702.194
History: Received June 18, 1973; Accepted December 31, 1973

A recorded list of 25 spondaic words was administered monaurally through earphones to 72 hearing-impaired children to evaluate their comprehension of “easy” speech material. The subjects ranged in age from eight to 16 years, and their average pure-tone thresholds (500-1000-2000 Hz) ranged in level from 52 to 127 dB (ANSI, 1969). Most spondee-recognition scores either were high (70 to 100* correct) or low (0 to 30% correct). The degree of overlap in thresholds between the high-scoring and the low-scoring groups differed as a function of the method used to describe the audiogram. The pure-tone average of 500-1000-2000 Hz was a good, but not perfect, predictor of spondee-recognition ability. In general, children with average pure-tone thresholds better than about 85 dB HTL (ANSI, 1969) scored high, and those with thresholds poorer than about 100 dB scored low. Spondee-recognition scores, however, could not be predicted with accuracy for children whose audiograms fell between 85 and 100 dB HTL.

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