Influence of Stimulus Level and Sleep Stage on the Early Components of the Averaged Electroencephalic Response to Clicks during All-Night Sleep Ongoing EEG activity was recorded from six adults from an electrode on the vertex referred to the right and left mastoids during nine nights of natural sleep. An electrode placed near the lateral canthus of each eye was used to record eye movements. The effect of stimulus level (0 to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1974
Influence of Stimulus Level and Sleep Stage on the Early Components of the Averaged Electroencephalic Response to Clicks during All-Night Sleep
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maurice I. Mendel
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1974
Influence of Stimulus Level and Sleep Stage on the Early Components of the Averaged Electroencephalic Response to Clicks during All-Night Sleep
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1974, Vol. 17, 5-17. doi:10.1044/jshr.1701.05
History: Received October 3, 1972 , Accepted September 28, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1974, Vol. 17, 5-17. doi:10.1044/jshr.1701.05
History: Received October 3, 1972; Accepted September 28, 1973

Ongoing EEG activity was recorded from six adults from an electrode on the vertex referred to the right and left mastoids during nine nights of natural sleep. An electrode placed near the lateral canthus of each eye was used to record eye movements. The effect of stimulus level (0 to 25 dB SL in 5-dB steps) on the early components of the averaged electroencephalic response was examined with clicks presented at a rate of five per second from a loudspeaker. Each response was averaged over 512 stimuli. Responses were sorted into the stage of sleep from which they were obtained. “Light” sleep included Stages REM and 2. “Deep” sleep included Stages 3 and 4. Response latency remained stable, while amplitude generally increased as a function of increasing sensation level. Little difference in peak latency and peak-to-peak amplitude was found when comparing light vs deep sleep. Latency measures for two consecutive nights were similar, but amplitude measures from the first night were significantly larger.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access