Some Motivational Correlates of Lipreading This study investigated the relationship between lipreading and three personality variables: (1) locus of control, (2) evaluative style, and (3) incentive orientation. Forty-eight fifth and sixth graders were administered inventory measures of these personality variables and the John Tracy Test of Lipreading. Eight groups were formed, with each group differing ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1974
Some Motivational Correlates of Lipreading
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas G. Giolas
    University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut
  • Earl C. Butterfield
    University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas
  • S. Joseph Weaver
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Lawrence, Kansas
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1974
Some Motivational Correlates of Lipreading
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1974, Vol. 17, 18-24. doi:10.1044/jshr.1701.18
History: Received January 8, 1973 , Accepted September 7, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1974, Vol. 17, 18-24. doi:10.1044/jshr.1701.18
History: Received January 8, 1973; Accepted September 7, 1973

This study investigated the relationship between lipreading and three personality variables: (1) locus of control, (2) evaluative style, and (3) incentive orientation. Forty-eight fifth and sixth graders were administered inventory measures of these personality variables and the John Tracy Test of Lipreading. Eight groups were formed, with each group differing on one variable but comparable on the other two variables. Intrinsically oriented children lipread significantly more words correctly than did extrinsically oriented children. Since no extrinsic rewards were offered, it may be assumed that the intrinsically oriented children found some reward in the lipreading task itself, that is, self-satisfaction in learning something new and a sense of achievement when they grasped the meaning of some items. Conversely, without feedback, extrinsically oriented children apparently found little reward in the lipreading task and, therefore, performed less well.

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