Communication Development in the First Three Years of Life Checklists were devised to record time-sampled behavior relating to eight modes of mother-to-child and child-to-mother communication. Subjects, chosen from middle-class families, were 48 children, aged one month to three years, and thenmothers. Data showed the relative frequency with which vocal and verbal behavior, eye contact, facial expression, body posture, action, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1974
Communication Development in the First Three Years of Life
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel Ling
    McGill University, Montreal, Quebec
  • Agnes H. Ling
    McGill University, Montreal, Quebec
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1974
Communication Development in the First Three Years of Life
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1974, Vol. 17, 146-159. doi:10.1044/jshr.1701.146
History: Received May 2, 1973 , Accepted December 10, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1974, Vol. 17, 146-159. doi:10.1044/jshr.1701.146
History: Received May 2, 1973; Accepted December 10, 1973

Checklists were devised to record time-sampled behavior relating to eight modes of mother-to-child and child-to-mother communication. Subjects, chosen from middle-class families, were 48 children, aged one month to three years, and thenmothers. Data showed the relative frequency with which vocal and verbal behavior, eye contact, facial expression, body posture, action, demonstration, and gesture were used in relation to die children’s age, sex, and position in the family. Trends in relation to age were largely predictable, except that mothers of young babies verbalized as frequently as did mothers of older infants. Imitations and expansions were seldom employed even by mothers of children in their third year. Verbalization was mainly related to ongoing events. Mothers made more body contact with young male infants and were most attentive to their first-born children. Time-sampling is suggested as an appropriate method for measuring the frequency with which different modes of communication are employed by hearing-impaired infants and their mothers before and during aural rehabilitation treatment.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access