The Conceptual Reality of Selected Distinctive Features An experiment was conducted in which a large group of subjects was asked to categorize speech stimuli. In each subexperiment, two groups of 10 subjects categorized, with immediate feedback, 90 stimuli consisting of six monosyllables arranged in 15 randomized blocks. One group, the feature-contrast group, could solve the categorization task ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1974
The Conceptual Reality of Selected Distinctive Features
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Conrad LaRiviere
    University of Missouri, Kansas City, Missouri
  • Harris Winitz
    University of Missouri, Kansas City, Missouri
  • James Reeds
    University of Missouri, Kansas City, Missouri
  • Eve Herriman
    University of Missouri, Kansas City, Missouri
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1974
The Conceptual Reality of Selected Distinctive Features
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1974, Vol. 17, 122-133. doi:10.1044/jshr.1701.122
History: Received April 9, 1973 , Accepted December 14, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1974, Vol. 17, 122-133. doi:10.1044/jshr.1701.122
History: Received April 9, 1973; Accepted December 14, 1973

An experiment was conducted in which a large group of subjects was asked to categorize speech stimuli. In each subexperiment, two groups of 10 subjects categorized, with immediate feedback, 90 stimuli consisting of six monosyllables arranged in 15 randomized blocks. One group, the feature-contrast group, could solve the categorization task on the basis of a feature contrast or rote memory. The second group, a control group, could operate only on the basis of rote memory. Data are presented for the following features: ± vocalic, ± voice, ± nasal, ± continuant, and ± strident. Results indicate that the nasal, strident, and vocalic features have conceptual reality, that pairing a conceptually real feature with a nonoonceptually real feature does not improve performance, and that the data are not easily related to many existing notions or data concerning distinctive-feature theory.

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