Averaged Encephalic Response of Aphasics to Linguistic and Nonlinguistic Auditory Stimuli This study investigated the averaged encephalic responses (AER) of aphasics to words and to white noise stimuli matched to the amplitude of each word. Subjects were classified according to the Functional Communication Profile. Fifty presentations of each of the stimuli were presented to the right and left ears of aphasics ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1974
Averaged Encephalic Response of Aphasics to Linguistic and Nonlinguistic Auditory Stimuli
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Herbert J. Greenberg
    Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio
  • Pamela J. Metting
    Hearing and Speech Center of Rochester, Rochester, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1974
Averaged Encephalic Response of Aphasics to Linguistic and Nonlinguistic Auditory Stimuli
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1974, Vol. 17, 113-121. doi:10.1044/jshr.1701.113
History: Received December 22, 1972 , Accepted November 20, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1974, Vol. 17, 113-121. doi:10.1044/jshr.1701.113
History: Received December 22, 1972; Accepted November 20, 1973

This study investigated the averaged encephalic responses (AER) of aphasics to words and to white noise stimuli matched to the amplitude of each word. Subjects were classified according to the Functional Communication Profile. Fifty presentations of each of the stimuli were presented to the right and left ears of aphasics while they were completing a simple recognition task. Electroencephalographic (EEG) activity was recorded from bipolar electrodes at right and left hemisphere placements (T5-F3; T6-F4). Differences were found in the component latencies between hemispheres, but further analysis showed that this was present only in those subjects who had severe communication difficulties. There were no significant AER differences between the stimuli, but the AERs obtained were inconsistent. The differences found could be a reflection of the damage to the left hemisphere which is outwardly affecting the aphasic’s communicative behavior.

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