The Grammatical Factor in Childhood Disfluency in Relation to the Continuity Hypothesis The relationship between grammatical function and disfluency was investigated in 15 normal-speaking children aged three years 11 months to four years 10 months. Pronouns and conjunctions appeared in significantly greater proportion among the subjects' disfluent words than among their total words. On the other hand, nouns, verbs, and prepositions had ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1973
The Grammatical Factor in Childhood Disfluency in Relation to the Continuity Hypothesis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Helaine Gewirtz Helmreich
    Brooklyn College, Brooklyn, New York
  • Oliver Bloodstein
    Brooklyn College, Brooklyn, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1973
The Grammatical Factor in Childhood Disfluency in Relation to the Continuity Hypothesis
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 731-738. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.731
History: Received September 21, 1972 , Accepted July 5, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 731-738. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.731
History: Received September 21, 1972; Accepted July 5, 1973

The relationship between grammatical function and disfluency was investigated in 15 normal-speaking children aged three years 11 months to four years 10 months. Pronouns and conjunctions appeared in significantly greater proportion among the subjects' disfluent words than among their total words. On the other hand, nouns, verbs, and prepositions had a significantly low frequency of disfluency. In many respects, the results were similar to those previously found for preschool stutterers, though a notable difference occurred in the case of verbs. The findings were interpreted to be in general accord with the hypothesis that a continuity exists between early stuttering and certain forms of normal childhood disfluency.

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