Short-Term Memory and Language Skills in Articulation-Deficient Children Short-term memory (STM) for three types of auditorily presented stimulus material was tested in 28 children with articulation deficits and 28 children with normal articulation. The stimulus material consisted of digit, random-word, and sentence strings that varied from four to 10 units in length. The group with good articulation performed ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1973
Short-Term Memory and Language Skills in Articulation-Deficient Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John H. Saxman
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
  • Jon F. Miller
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1973
Short-Term Memory and Language Skills in Articulation-Deficient Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 721-730. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.721
History: Received April 26, 1973 , Accepted September 15, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 721-730. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.721
History: Received April 26, 1973; Accepted September 15, 1973

Short-term memory (STM) for three types of auditorily presented stimulus material was tested in 28 children with articulation deficits and 28 children with normal articulation. The stimulus material consisted of digit, random-word, and sentence strings that varied from four to 10 units in length. The group with good articulation performed significantly better than the group with articulation deficits on the sentence recall task, but not on the digit and random-word tasks. Recall was significantly better for sentences than for digits and random words for both groups. Recall scores for sentence material were not correlated with articulation error scores but were correlated significantly with language comprehension scores (Carrow test, r = −0.37, p < 0.05, df = 26) and auditory discrimination scores (Wepman test, r = −0.35, p < 0.05, df = 26) obtained for the same subjects in a parallel study. It was concluded that sentence structure is less helpful for children with articulation deficits than for children with normal articulation in the immediate recall of lexical items. A diminished linguistic ability, rather than a general STM deficit, best accounts for this performance difference. Number of articulation errors is not related directly to the STM for sentence performance difference.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access