The Development of Auditory Feedback Monitoring: Delayed Auditory Feedback Studies on the Vocalizations of Children Aged Six Months to 19 Months As part of a series of experiments to determine the earliest age at which there is evidence of auditory feedback monitoring, the vocalizations of 28 children aged six to 19 months were recorded during simultaneous auditory feedback (SAF) and a 200-msec delay in auditory feedback (DAF). Measurements were made of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1973
The Development of Auditory Feedback Monitoring: Delayed Auditory Feedback Studies on the Vocalizations of Children Aged Six Months to 19 Months
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • N. Fargo Belmore
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Diane Kewley-Port
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Richard L. Mobley
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Violet E. Goodman
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1973
The Development of Auditory Feedback Monitoring: Delayed Auditory Feedback Studies on the Vocalizations of Children Aged Six Months to 19 Months
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 709-720. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.709
History: Received June 8, 1971 , Accepted July 19, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 709-720. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.709
History: Received June 8, 1971; Accepted July 19, 1973

As part of a series of experiments to determine the earliest age at which there is evidence of auditory feedback monitoring, the vocalizations of 28 children aged six to 19 months were recorded during simultaneous auditory feedback (SAF) and a 200-msec delay in auditory feedback (DAF). Measurements were made of duration and peak soind pressure level. Of the 28 children, 13 showed a significant change (p < 0.10) on one or both of the two parameters. The usual change was a decrease, the opposite of the effect usually shown by adults. The best single measure of the DAF effect appeared to be duration. The best indicator of whether or not there would be a significant change was language development in that the greatest changes were observed among the children who were most advanced linguistically. It is not certain that the vocalizations of those children who showed a significant DAF effect are under closed-loop auditory feedback control.

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