Stuttering and Disfluency as Two Reliable and Unambiguous Response Classes This experiment tested the utility of agreement as a method to separate stutterings and disfluencies into two reliable and unambiguous response classes. Reliability was determined by measures of interjudge and intrajudge agreement. The ambiguity of the two response classes was determined first, by the extent to which the two terms ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1973
Stuttering and Disfluency as Two Reliable and Unambiguous Response Classes
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James D. MacDonald
    Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
  • Richard R. Martin
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1973
Stuttering and Disfluency as Two Reliable and Unambiguous Response Classes
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 691-699. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.691
History: Received September 18, 1972 , Accepted July 19, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 691-699. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.691
History: Received September 18, 1972; Accepted July 19, 1973

This experiment tested the utility of agreement as a method to separate stutterings and disfluencies into two reliable and unambiguous response classes. Reliability was determined by measures of interjudge and intrajudge agreement. The ambiguity of the two response classes was determined first, by the extent to which the two terms were applied to the same behaviors, and second, by differential location of units on words and intervals. Thirty college students identified stutterings and disfluencies from several five-second video-taped samples of stutterers in spontaneous speech. The results appear to support a series of conclusions. First, a small group of stutterings and a small group of disfluencies were identified both reliably and unambiguously; thus, two separate response classes sufficient to the requirements of behavioral research were isolated. Second, when all stutterings, regardless of agreement, were considered as a response class, that response class was highly unreliable. Third, regardless of the level of agreement, the terms disfluency and stuttering were generally applied to different and nonoverlapping behaviors. Fourth, further evidence of the distinctiveness of stutterings and disfluencies was the finding that stutterings generally occurred on words and disfluencies on intervals.

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