Computerized Pure-Tone Audiometric Procedures The purpose of this study was to develop a computer program and the necessary interfacing systems which would enable a PDP/8-I digital computer to (1) control all aspects of administering pure-tone air- and bone-conduction stimuli; (2) recognize the need for masking based on unmasked auditory thresholds, determine the appropriate level ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1973
Computerized Pure-Tone Audiometric Procedures
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas J. Wood
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
  • Walter W. Wittich
    Southeast Missouri State College, Cape Girardeau, Missouri
  • Robert B. Mahaffey
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1973
Computerized Pure-Tone Audiometric Procedures
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 676-684. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.676
History: Received September 21, 1972 , Accepted July 15, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 676-684. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.676
History: Received September 21, 1972; Accepted July 15, 1973

The purpose of this study was to develop a computer program and the necessary interfacing systems which would enable a PDP/8-I digital computer to (1) control all aspects of administering pure-tone air- and bone-conduction stimuli; (2) recognize the need for masking based on unmasked auditory thresholds, determine the appropriate level of masking, and regulate the presentation of the masker to the nontest ear; (3) analyze the subject’s responses to the above procedures in terms of threshold-determination criteria; and (4) present the obtained thresholds in audiogram format at the conclusion of the computerized testing procedure. The threshold accuracy of this automated design was evaluated in terms of Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients and average deviations of differences obtained between thresholds determined by a clinical audiologist and computer-determined threshold values when each performed these audiometric test procedures on the same hypacusic subjects. The results of this study indicate that the computerized procedures used to determine pure-tone air- and bone-conduction thresholds are, in terms of the patients tested, a clinically feasible means of assessing these auditory functions.

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