The Effect of Reduced Reading Rate on Stuttering Frequency This study evaluated how a decrease in reading rate would affect stuttering frequency. Eighteen stutterers read the same passage aloud in two conditions. Habitual reading rates and styles were required in the control condition. In the experimental condition, reading rates were significantly reduced by allowing subjects to see and read ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1973
The Effect of Reduced Reading Rate on Stuttering Frequency
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Martin R. Adams
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Jeffrey I. Lewis
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Thomas E. Besozzi
    Goodwill Rehabilitation Center, Canton, Ohio
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1973
The Effect of Reduced Reading Rate on Stuttering Frequency
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 671-675. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.671
History: Received May 22, 1973 , Accepted November 9, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 671-675. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.671
History: Received May 22, 1973; Accepted November 9, 1973

This study evaluated how a decrease in reading rate would affect stuttering frequency. Eighteen stutterers read the same passage aloud in two conditions. Habitual reading rates and styles were required in the control condition. In the experimental condition, reading rates were significantly reduced by allowing subjects to see and read one word per second. When reading rates were manipulated in this way, significantly less stuttering occurred. Note was taken of the fact that, in the experimental condition, stutterers had to use a speech pattern that minimized the normal requirements of rapid coordination and transition across word boundaries. If stuttering is a phonetic transition defect, then the aforementioned pattern, which calls for less coordination and transition, should promote fluency. From this reasoning, it follows that the decrease in stuttering noted was as much dependent upon the manner of reading demanded of subjects as the reading rate forced upon them.

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