Aphasic Comprehension of Time Spacing Receptive difficulty is known to be of crucial significance in the disorder of aphasia. Auditory comprehension difficulty has been related to an inability to perceive the temporal sequence of aural stimuli. This experiment tested the hypothesis that aphasics might be aided in comprehending speech sounds by a method called interpolated ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1973
Aphasic Comprehension of Time Spacing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph G. Sheehan
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, California
  • Suzanne Aseltine
    Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, California
  • Allan E. Edwards
    Veterans Administration Center, Los Angeles, California
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1973
Aphasic Comprehension of Time Spacing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 650-657. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.650
History: Received July 25, 1972 , Accepted August 31, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 650-657. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.650
History: Received July 25, 1972; Accepted August 31, 1973

Receptive difficulty is known to be of crucial significance in the disorder of aphasia. Auditory comprehension difficulty has been related to an inability to perceive the temporal sequence of aural stimuli. This experiment tested the hypothesis that aphasics might be aided in comprehending speech sounds by a method called interpolated silences. Thirty aphasic veterans were tested on the Sklar Aphasia Scale. Fifteen over 50 were then compared with 15 under 50 on selections from the Sequential Tests of Educational Progress listening test under three conditions: normal enunciation, interpolated silences, and accumulated time. Interpolated silence surrounded every phoneme with 150 msec of silence. The accumulated time condition inserted the same amount of silences, but after each word. Each condition was put on video tape imaging the experimenter’s head and shoulders with lip synchronizing. Each subject served under all three conditions in counterbalanced sequences. With the younger group, interpolated silences resulted in improved performance, but the improvement was not noted in the older group. Though the younger and older groups differed somewhat in their degrees of deficit, the factor of age emerged from this study as being of great significance in evaluating the aphasic’s probable responsiveness to interpolated silences.

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