Comprehension of Linguistic Concepts Requiring Logical Operations by Learning-Disabled Children The comprehension of linguistic concepts requiring logical operations was compared in 32 learning-disabled and 16 achieving children. The results indicated that the learning-disabled children made significantly more errors than their controls. Comparison of the performances of learning-disabled males and females indicated no significant differences. It was concluded that children with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1973
Comprehension of Linguistic Concepts Requiring Logical Operations by Learning-Disabled Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elisabeth H. Wiig
    Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Eleanor M. Semel
    Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1973
Comprehension of Linguistic Concepts Requiring Logical Operations by Learning-Disabled Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 627-636. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.627
History: Received December 11, 1972 , Accepted October 15, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 627-636. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.627
History: Received December 11, 1972; Accepted October 15, 1973

The comprehension of linguistic concepts requiring logical operations was compared in 32 learning-disabled and 16 achieving children. The results indicated that the learning-disabled children made significantly more errors than their controls. Comparison of the performances of learning-disabled males and females indicated no significant differences. It was concluded that children with specific learning disabilities exhibit significant deficits in their ability to comprehend linguistic concepts requiring logical operations. These deficits were interpreted to reflect impairments of abstraction and generalization and simultaneous analysis and synthesis as well as delays in logical development. Subsequently, the effect of remedial intervention was assessed in six learning-disabled, first-grade, transition-class males. The results showed no significant performance changes during a six-week control period before training. In contrast, there was a significant improvement in sentence comprehension after six weeks of remedial intervention. The preliminary finding that remedial intervention effectively improved logicogrammatical sentence comprehension indicates a favorable prognosis for the remediation of these deficits in children with learning disabilities.

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