Acceptability Ratings of Normal, Esophageal, and Artificial Larynx Speech To provide information about the ultimate acceptability of various types of alaryngeal speech, 37 listeners rated nine speakers with normal phonation in relation to two groups of superior alaryngeal speakers: five who used esophageal speech and four who used artificial larynges. Normal speech was rated significantly more acceptable than any ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1973
Acceptability Ratings of Normal, Esophageal, and Artificial Larynx Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Suzanne Bennett
    Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis, Indiana
  • Bernd Weinberg
    Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis, Indiana
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1973
Acceptability Ratings of Normal, Esophageal, and Artificial Larynx Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 608-615. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.608
History: Received January 3, 1973 , Accepted August 15, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 608-615. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.608
History: Received January 3, 1973; Accepted August 15, 1973

To provide information about the ultimate acceptability of various types of alaryngeal speech, 37 listeners rated nine speakers with normal phonation in relation to two groups of superior alaryngeal speakers: five who used esophageal speech and four who used artificial larynges. Normal speech was rated significantly more acceptable than any form of alaryngeal speech studied. Speech produced with a Tokyo artificial larynx was rated significantly more acceptable than all other types of alaryngeal speech. Superior esophageal speech was significantly preferred over Western Electric reed and Bell electrolarynx speech. Listeners also categorized each of the 18 speakers as a normal speaker or not a normal speaker. The nine alaryngeal speakers were all classified as nonnormal, while eight of the nine normal subjects were classified as normal.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access