Loudness Growth under Masking: Relation to True Sensorineural Impairment Alternate binaural loudness balances between masked and unmasked normal ears were performed to examine the growth of loudness as a function of masker level at each of several frequencies (500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz) and to determine whether the recruitmentlike phenomenon in masked ears is comparable in its growth ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1973
Loudness Growth under Masking: Relation to True Sensorineural Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alan M. Richards
    Herbert H. Lehman College of the City University of New York, Bronx, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1973
Loudness Growth under Masking: Relation to True Sensorineural Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 597-607. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.597
History: Received August 31, 1972 , Accepted July 15, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1973, Vol. 16, 597-607. doi:10.1044/jshr.1604.597
History: Received August 31, 1972; Accepted July 15, 1973

Alternate binaural loudness balances between masked and unmasked normal ears were performed to examine the growth of loudness as a function of masker level at each of several frequencies (500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz) and to determine whether the recruitmentlike phenomenon in masked ears is comparable in its growth and form to actual recruitment growth in sensorineural impaired ears. The results for 28 subjects indicated that for all frequencies a power function relating the perceived loudness in the masked ear to the unmasked ear could be drawn, and that the slope of this function rose as a function of increased masking. The family of slopes for each frequency was linearly related to the induced threshold shift. The slope of this latter relation proved to be frequency dependent. Comparison between the slope growth in simulated hearing loss and the family of loudness-balance slopes obtained from patients with true unilateral loss of varying degree indicated that the slopes of loudness-balance functions in the latter group also increased linearly with increased loss. In this latter instance, however, the slope growth was not frequency dependent, thus pointing to an essential difference between simulated and actual loudness recruitment growth.

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