Communication Skills in Five-Year-Old Children with High-Risk Neonatal Histories Speech, language, auditory, and intellectual development were tested in 81 fiveyear-old children with one or more of the following high-risk histories: birth weight less than 2500 grams; gestational age less than 38 weeks; SGA; Rh or ABO blood incompatibility; respiratory distress; and hyperbilirubinemia greater than 15 mg%. Tests included the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1973
Communication Skills in Five-Year-Old Children with High-Risk Neonatal Histories
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carol H. Ehrlich
    Children’s Hospital, Denver, Colorado
  • Esther Shapiro
    Children’s Hospital, Denver, Colorado
  • Bud D. Kimball
    Colorado Springs, Colorado
  • Muriel Huttner
    Children’s Hospital, Denver, Colorado
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1973
Communication Skills in Five-Year-Old Children with High-Risk Neonatal Histories
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1973, Vol. 16, 522-529. doi:10.1044/jshr.1603.522
History: Received August 9, 1972 , Accepted May 17, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1973, Vol. 16, 522-529. doi:10.1044/jshr.1603.522
History: Received August 9, 1972; Accepted May 17, 1973

Speech, language, auditory, and intellectual development were tested in 81 fiveyear-old children with one or more of the following high-risk histories: birth weight less than 2500 grams; gestational age less than 38 weeks; SGA; Rh or ABO blood incompatibility; respiratory distress; and hyperbilirubinemia greater than 15 mg%. Tests included the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, Templin-Darley Articulation Screening, the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities, the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, the Leiter International Performance Scale, audiologic evaluation, and physical examination. Despite normal intelligence, 54% of the children needed special help. Respiratory distress or abnormal birth weight and gestational age led to the greatest incidence of disability. Significant problems were most often noted in auditory and visual figure-ground discrimination and memory, physical examination, expressive vocabulary, and block design. Also noted were difficulties in word finding, articulation, sentence memory, similarities, mazes, sound blending, geometric design, and attention span.

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