“Same” and “Different” Concepts and Children’s Performance on Speech Sound Discrimination Thirty children four to eight years of age were tested with two speech-sound discrimination tasks. In one, they were asked to identify a pair of nonsense syllables as “same” or “different,” and in the other they were asked to repeat the syllable pair. The youngest children (mean age four years, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1973
“Same” and “Different” Concepts and Children’s Performance on Speech Sound Discrimination
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara Beving
    Tama County Department of Special Education, Toledo, Iowa
  • Roy E. Eblen
    University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1973
“Same” and “Different” Concepts and Children’s Performance on Speech Sound Discrimination
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1973, Vol. 16, 513-517. doi:10.1044/jshr.1603.513
History: Received January 3, 1973 , Accepted June 1, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1973, Vol. 16, 513-517. doi:10.1044/jshr.1603.513
History: Received January 3, 1973; Accepted June 1, 1973

Thirty children four to eight years of age were tested with two speech-sound discrimination tasks. In one, they were asked to identify a pair of nonsense syllables as “same” or “different,” and in the other they were asked to repeat the syllable pair. The youngest children (mean age four years, seven months) scored better on the imitation task than on the “same-different” task, while the other groups (mean ages six years, seven months and eight years, six months) did not differ in their ability to perform either task. The youngest group differed from the two older groups in their score on the same-different task but not on the imitation task. Thus, the preschoolage subjects were thought to be unable to make the cognitive judgment “same” or “different,” although they were able to discriminate as well as the older children.

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