Discrimination of Formant Frequency Transitions in Synthetic Vowels Discrimination of second-formant (F2) transitions in synthetic vowels was measured with and without the first formant (F1) present, with and without a transition in F1, and with F1 at various amplitudes relative to F2. Four normal-hearing subjects and 24 subjects with sensorineural loss were tested. At comfortably loud listening levels, ... Research Article
EDITOR'S AWARD
Research Article  |   September 01, 1973
Discrimination of Formant Frequency Transitions in Synthetic Vowels
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ellen Martin Danaher
    Sensory Communication Research Laboratory, Gallaudet College, Washington, D.C.
  • Mary Joe Osberger
    Army Audiology and Speech Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, D.C.
  • James M. Pickett
    Sensory Communication Research Laboratory, Gallaudet College, Washington, D.C.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1973
Discrimination of Formant Frequency Transitions in Synthetic Vowels
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1973, Vol. 16, 439-451. doi:10.1044/jshr.1603.439
History: Received September 5, 1972 , Accepted May 30, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1973, Vol. 16, 439-451. doi:10.1044/jshr.1603.439
History: Received September 5, 1972; Accepted May 30, 1973

Discrimination of second-formant (F2) transitions in synthetic vowels was measured with and without the first formant (F1) present, with and without a transition in F1, and with F1 at various amplitudes relative to F2. Four normal-hearing subjects and 24 subjects with sensorineural loss were tested. At comfortably loud listening levels, F1 interferes with discrimination of F2 transitions by sensorineural subjects. Discrimination is affected by (1) the frequency region in which the F2 transitions occur, (2) the relative amplitudes of F1 and F2, (3) the presence of frequency transitions in F1, (4) the audiometric configuration of the listener, and (5) the proximity of F1 to F2, in that order. When tested at high sound levels (95 and 105 dB SPL), normal-hearing subjects also show reduced discrimination.

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