An Interpretation of Jaw Acceleration during Speech as a Muscle Forcing Function Recordings of jaw acceleration (Jx/t2) were obtained in an attempt to provide some information on the nature of the jaw muscle forcing function during speech. The impetus for this approximation was provided by Newton’s second law of motion. The speech wave, intraoral air pressure (Po), jaw displacement (Jx), and jaw ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1973
An Interpretation of Jaw Acceleration during Speech as a Muscle Forcing Function
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James H. Abbs
    University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
  • Ronald Netsell
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1973
An Interpretation of Jaw Acceleration during Speech as a Muscle Forcing Function
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1973, Vol. 16, 421-425. doi:10.1044/jshr.1603.421
History: Received February 8, 1972 , Accepted February 17, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1973, Vol. 16, 421-425. doi:10.1044/jshr.1603.421
History: Received February 8, 1972; Accepted February 17, 1973

Recordings of jaw acceleration (Jx/t2) were obtained in an attempt to provide some information on the nature of the jaw muscle forcing function during speech. The impetus for this approximation was provided by Newton’s second law of motion. The speech wave, intraoral air pressure (Po), jaw displacement (Jx), and jaw velocity (Jx/t) were simultaneously recorded with Jx/t2 to facilitate inferences to net muscle force. Based on the rationale and preliminary data presented here, this interpretation appears to represent a powerful explanatory tool for speech physiology research.

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