Speaking Rate: Effects on Children’s Comprehension of Normal Speech This study investigated the comprehension of speech among children in maturational stages of linguistic development when speech was presented at varying rates of utterance by a trained speaker. Five groups, each consisting of a subgroup of 10 kindergarten and a subgroup of 10 second-grade children, were presented with a tape-recorded ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1973
Speaking Rate: Effects on Children’s Comprehension of Normal Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary D. Berry
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
  • Robert L. Erickson
    Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1973
Speaking Rate: Effects on Children’s Comprehension of Normal Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1973, Vol. 16, 367-374. doi:10.1044/jshr.1603.367
History: Received March 22, 1972 , Accepted December 12, 1972
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1973, Vol. 16, 367-374. doi:10.1044/jshr.1603.367
History: Received March 22, 1972; Accepted December 12, 1972

This study investigated the comprehension of speech among children in maturational stages of linguistic development when speech was presented at varying rates of utterance by a trained speaker. Five groups, each consisting of a subgroup of 10 kindergarten and a subgroup of 10 second-grade children, were presented with a tape-recorded administration of the receptive section of the Northwestern Syntax Screening Test (NSST). Each group heard the test at one or another of the following rates: 2.6, 3.4, 4.7, 5.3, or 6.3 syllables per second. A mean comprehension score was determined for each group and subgroup, and a treatment-by-levels analysis of variance was completed. Results indicated that comprehension was higher at the two slower rates than at the three faster rates. Rate by grade interaction was nonsignificant and comprehension differences between sexes appeared virtually nonexistent.

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