Orosensory Perception, Speech Production, and Deafness The oral form-discrimination abilities of 18 orally educated and oriented deaf high school subjects were determined and compared to those of manually educated and oriented deaf subjects and normal-hearing subjects. The similarities and differences among the responses of the three groups were discussed and then compared to responses elicited from ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1973
Orosensory Perception, Speech Production, and Deafness
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Milo E. Bishop
    Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana
  • Robert L. Ringel
    Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana
  • Arthur S. House
    Institute for Defense Analyses, Princeton, New Jersey
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1973
Orosensory Perception, Speech Production, and Deafness
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1973, Vol. 16, 257-266. doi:10.1044/jshr.1602.257
History: Received August 14, 1972 , Accepted March 8, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1973, Vol. 16, 257-266. doi:10.1044/jshr.1602.257
History: Received August 14, 1972; Accepted March 8, 1973

The oral form-discrimination abilities of 18 orally educated and oriented deaf high school subjects were determined and compared to those of manually educated and oriented deaf subjects and normal-hearing subjects. The similarities and differences among the responses of the three groups were discussed and then compared to responses elicited from subjects with functional disorders of articulation. In general, the discrimination scores separated the manual deaf from the other two groups, particularly when differences in form shapes were involved in the test. The implications of the results for theories relating orosensory-discrimination abilities are discussed. It is postulated that, while a failure in oroperceptual functioning may lead to disorders of articulation, a failure to use the oral mechanism for speech activities, even in persons with normal orosensory capabilities, may result in poor performance on oroperceptual tasks.

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