The “Phonemic” Content of Backward-Reproduced Speech Three hundred pain of consonant- (or consonantal cluster-) vowel syllables were spoken as though they were spondaic words. Students of phonetics (n = 21), working individually, listened to these as backward-pkved speech and transcribed them in phonetic symbols. In the backward rendition there was a prevowel event, usually designated /w/. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1973
The “Phonemic” Content of Backward-Reproduced Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John W. Black
    Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1973
The “Phonemic” Content of Backward-Reproduced Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1973, Vol. 16, 165-174. doi:10.1044/jshr.1602.165
History: Received December 29, 1971 , Accepted September 1, 1972
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1973, Vol. 16, 165-174. doi:10.1044/jshr.1602.165
History: Received December 29, 1971; Accepted September 1, 1972

Three hundred pain of consonant- (or consonantal cluster-) vowel syllables were spoken as though they were spondaic words. Students of phonetics (n = 21), working individually, listened to these as backward-pkved speech and transcribed them in phonetic symbols. In the backward rendition there was a prevowel event, usually designated /w/. Although the vowel was uniformly /u/ and the pronunciation was verified by monitors, those listening to the backward reproduction transcribed a number of central and bade vowels, usually half-closed and rarely the back, closed /u/. Some consonants when spoken initially and heard terminally as backward phonemes were identified “correctly”: /z, sf, k, r/, not /pr/. Fricativeness and nasality were preserved in backward-played speech; lateralness and glideness were not.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access