The Effect of Interposed Conditions on the Consistency of Stuttering Two experiments were carried out to test the hypothesis that the consistency effect in stuttering is due mainly to the subject’s memory of his stuttered words in preceding readings of the test passage. In Experiment I (n = 14), extraneous oral reading was interposed between two readings of the same ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1973
The Effect of Interposed Conditions on the Consistency of Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alida Seidel
    Brooklyn College, Brooklyn, New York
  • Rona B. Weinstein
    Brooklyn College, Brooklyn, New York
  • Oliver Bloodstein
    Brooklyn College, Brooklyn, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1973
The Effect of Interposed Conditions on the Consistency of Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1973, Vol. 16, 62-66. doi:10.1044/jshr.1601.62
History: Received January 14, 1972 , Accepted November 15, 1972
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1973, Vol. 16, 62-66. doi:10.1044/jshr.1601.62
History: Received January 14, 1972; Accepted November 15, 1972

Two experiments were carried out to test the hypothesis that the consistency effect in stuttering is due mainly to the subject’s memory of his stuttered words in preceding readings of the test passage. In Experiment I (n = 14), extraneous oral reading was interposed between two readings of the same passage. There was no effect on the consistency of loci of the stutterings. In Experiment II (n = 14), there was a twoweek interval between the two readings. Significant consistency was still evident at the end of this time. These results suggest that memory of stuttering in preceding readings is probably not the major reason for the consistency effect. The major reason would seem to be that stuttering is in considerable part a learned response to certain types of contextual stimuli.

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