Reflex Contraction of Middle-Ear Muscles Secondary to Stimulation of Laryngeal Nerves Electromyographic evidence of middle-ear muscle activity in association with vocalization has been reported in the waking cat and in man. This investigation dealt with the consideration of whether the middle-ear muscles and laryngeal muscles are activated together on a reflexive level. Rectangular-wave electrical pulses of 0.10 msec duration (one to ... Research Article
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Research Article  |   March 01, 1973
Reflex Contraction of Middle-Ear Muscles Secondary to Stimulation of Laryngeal Nerves
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gerald N. McCall
    State University of New York, Upstate Medical Center, Syracuse, New York
  • Daniel D. Rabuzzi
    State University of New York, Upstate Medical Center, Syracuse, New York
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1973
Reflex Contraction of Middle-Ear Muscles Secondary to Stimulation of Laryngeal Nerves
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1973, Vol. 16, 56-61. doi:10.1044/jshr.1601.56
History: Received August 14, 1972 , Accepted January 25, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1973, Vol. 16, 56-61. doi:10.1044/jshr.1601.56
History: Received August 14, 1972; Accepted January 25, 1973

Electromyographic evidence of middle-ear muscle activity in association with vocalization has been reported in the waking cat and in man. This investigation dealt with the consideration of whether the middle-ear muscles and laryngeal muscles are activated together on a reflexive level. Rectangular-wave electrical pulses of 0.10 msec duration (one to two volts) were used to stimulate the ipsilateral and contralateral recurrent and internal laryngeal nerves in anesthetized cats (n = 20). Simultaneous electromyographic recordings were obtained from the stapedius, tensor tympani, and cricothyroid muscles. The data provided evidence of a reflex interconnection between the middle-ear muscles and sensory nervous supply to the larynx. Reflex contraction of the stapedius and tensor tympani muscles was elicited by electrical stimulation of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve. The reflex discharges in the tympanic muscles occurred in association with reflex contraction of the cricothyroid muscle. Although not conclusive, the reflex contraction of the middle-ear muscles elicited by internal laryngeal nerve stimulation appeared to be bilateral. Hie significance of this reflex interconnection between the larynx and middle-ear muscles is unclear at the present time.

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