Relationship of Lingual and Intraoral Air Pressures during Syllable Production The production of many consonant sounds requires a buildup of air pressure within die oral cavity. This buildup often results from resistance to air flow created in the vocal tract by tongue movements. This study investigated the relationship of tongue pressure to intraoral air pressure. Four male speakers repeated VCV ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1973
Relationship of Lingual and Intraoral Air Pressures during Syllable Production
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • W. S. Brown, Jr.
    University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
  • Robert E. McGlone
    State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York
  • William R. Proffit
    University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1973
Relationship of Lingual and Intraoral Air Pressures during Syllable Production
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1973, Vol. 16, 141-151. doi:10.1044/jshr.1601.141
History: Received January 14, 1972 , Accepted January 5, 1973
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1973, Vol. 16, 141-151. doi:10.1044/jshr.1601.141
History: Received January 14, 1972; Accepted January 5, 1973

The production of many consonant sounds requires a buildup of air pressure within die oral cavity. This buildup often results from resistance to air flow created in the vocal tract by tongue movements. This study investigated the relationship of tongue pressure to intraoral air pressure. Four male speakers repeated VCV syllables containing /t/, /d/, and /n/ combined with /i/, /α/, and /u/. Each combination was repeated at a constant rate at three intensity levels. Air-pressure variations associated with the consonants were recorded from the oral-pharyngeal region while tongue pressures were recorded from behind the maxillary central incisors and above the left and right maxillary molars. The results show that for stop-consonant production, air pressures and lateral tongue pressures vary in parallel manner, whereas tongue tip pressures appear to act independently of both air and side tongue pressures. Vocal intensity changes are an exception to this in that both intraoral air and tongue pressures increased as intensity increased, the greatest change occurring for tongue tip pressures.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access