The Perception of Stress as a Semantic Cue in Aphasia Stress as a phonemic feature in English serves only to distinguish syntactic class membership for nouns vs verbs (cónvict-convíct) or noun vs noun phrases (rédcoat vs red cóat). The capacity for these discriminations was compared in 17 aphasic patients and 13 controls who were not brain damaged. The subjects' task ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1972
The Perception of Stress as a Semantic Cue in Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sheila Blumstein
    Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
  • Harold Goodglass
    Veterans Administration Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1972
The Perception of Stress as a Semantic Cue in Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1972, Vol. 15, 800-806. doi:10.1044/jshr.1504.800
History: Received May 23, 1972
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1972, Vol. 15, 800-806. doi:10.1044/jshr.1504.800
History: Received May 23, 1972

Stress as a phonemic feature in English serves only to distinguish syntactic class membership for nouns vs verbs (cónvict-convíct) or noun vs noun phrases (rédcoat vs red cóat). The capacity for these discriminations was compared in 17 aphasic patients and 13 controls who were not brain damaged. The subjects' task was to choose the most appropriate picture out of an array of four in response to the spoken stimulus. Results indicated there were no differences between the two groups in the proportion of correct responses pairing stress pattern with the appropriate syntactic class. However, aphasics chose significantly more items unrelated to the target than did the normals. Moreover, both groups shared the same pattern of errors with significantly more errors in both noun phrases (NP) and verbs (V) than in nouns (N). Although stress perception is a difficult discrimination for both normals and aphasics, it is preserved in aphasia.

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