Temporary Threshold Shift Reduction as a Function of Contralateral Noise Level Seven male and seven female subjects were exposed to a monaurally presented 1000-Hz continuous tone at 110 dB SPL for three minutes. During the exposure pulsed wide-band noise (one second on / one second off) was presented to the contralateral ear. Six noise levels (70, 80, 90, 100, 110, and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1972
Temporary Threshold Shift Reduction as a Function of Contralateral Noise Level
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Raymond S. Karlovich
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
  • Barry F. Luterman
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
  • Mary H. Abbs
    University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1972
Temporary Threshold Shift Reduction as a Function of Contralateral Noise Level
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1972, Vol. 15, 792-799. doi:10.1044/jshr.1504.792
History: Received April 4, 1972
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1972, Vol. 15, 792-799. doi:10.1044/jshr.1504.792
History: Received April 4, 1972

Seven male and seven female subjects were exposed to a monaurally presented 1000-Hz continuous tone at 110 dB SPL for three minutes. During the exposure pulsed wide-band noise (one second on / one second off) was presented to the contralateral ear. Six noise levels (70, 80, 90, 100, 110, and 115 dB SPL) were used. In addition, a control condition consisting of the absence of contralateral stimulation was used. Pre- and postexposure thresholds were tracked with a Bekesy type procedure for a stimulus one-half octave above the exposure frequency. TTS was greatest for the control condition (no contralateral noise) and became progressively less as the SPL of contralateral noise was increased from 70 to 115 dB. The inverse relation between magnitude of TTS and the level of contralateral noise was attributed to stapedius muscle activity. Hence, the data provided psychophysical support for the contention that the stapedius muscle reflex is graded in response to the level of acoustic stimulation. The data also indicated an absence of significant differences in TTS magnitudes between males and females.

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