Disfluency and Word Length Five studies are reported in which the magnitude of the influence of word length upon the loci of instances of disfluency in the oral reading of stutterers and nonstutterers was investigated. The findings suggest that one factor which makes stutterers “unique”—differentiates them from nonstutterers—is not that they are more likely ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1972
Disfluency and Word Length
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Franklin H. Silverman
    University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1972
Disfluency and Word Length
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1972, Vol. 15, 788-791. doi:10.1044/jshr.1504.788
History: Received July 16, 1971
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1972, Vol. 15, 788-791. doi:10.1044/jshr.1504.788
History: Received July 16, 1971

Five studies are reported in which the magnitude of the influence of word length upon the loci of instances of disfluency in the oral reading of stutterers and nonstutterers was investigated. The findings suggest that one factor which makes stutterers “unique”—differentiates them from nonstutterers—is not that they are more likely to be disfluent on long than on short words as has been assumed in the past, but rather the opposite. That is, word length does not exert as strong an influence upon the loci or their disfluencies as is “normal.” In other words, stutterers are more likely to be disfluent on short words than their nonstuttering peers.

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