Interaural Phase Disparity of Stutterers and Nonstutterers Stutterers and nonstutterers cancelled the auditory sensation evoked by bone-conducted sinusoidal signals. They accomplished this by appropriate phase and amplitude adjustments of simultaneously presented bilateral air-conducted signals of the same frequency. Criterion measures of interaural phase difference at the point of cancellation were obtained for seven frequencies. The mean interaural ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1972
Interaural Phase Disparity of Stutterers and Nonstutterers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Courtney Stromsta
    Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1972
Interaural Phase Disparity of Stutterers and Nonstutterers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1972, Vol. 15, 771-780. doi:10.1044/jshr.1504.771
History: Received April 18, 1972
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1972, Vol. 15, 771-780. doi:10.1044/jshr.1504.771
History: Received April 18, 1972

Stutterers and nonstutterers cancelled the auditory sensation evoked by bone-conducted sinusoidal signals. They accomplished this by appropriate phase and amplitude adjustments of simultaneously presented bilateral air-conducted signals of the same frequency. Criterion measures of interaural phase difference at the point of cancellation were obtained for seven frequencies. The mean interaural phase differences obtained by stutterers were consistently greater than those of the nonstutterers. Based on time-equivalent values of the mean interaural phase differences, the values for stutterers were approximately twice as great as for nonstutterers at 150, 300, and 1200 Hz. The mean interaural phase difference found to exist for stutterers at 150 Hz approximates the magnitude of phase shift of normally delayed air-conducted auditory feedback of speech sounds that serves to induce experimental blockage of phonation. This relationship, in view of other findings, offers credence to the idea that disturbance of laryngeal function effected by an anomalous audition-phonation control system could be a causative agent in stuttering.

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