Assessment and Modification of Verbal Imitation with Low-Functioning Retarded Children An institutionalized population of 30 children was given a speech sound imitation test composed of 25 consonant-vowel combinations. Results of this assessment indicated that although the retarded children made more errors than preschool children, the pattern of errors was similar. The most frequent type of error made by low-functioning children ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1972
Assessment and Modification of Verbal Imitation with Low-Functioning Retarded Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William A. Bricker
    Peabody College, Nashville, Tennessee
  • Diane D. Bricker
    Peabody College, Nashville, Tennessee
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1972
Assessment and Modification of Verbal Imitation with Low-Functioning Retarded Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1972, Vol. 15, 690-698. doi:10.1044/jshr.1504.690
History: Received October 27, 1971
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1972, Vol. 15, 690-698. doi:10.1044/jshr.1504.690
History: Received October 27, 1971

An institutionalized population of 30 children was given a speech sound imitation test composed of 25 consonant-vowel combinations. Results of this assessment indicated that although the retarded children made more errors than preschool children, the pattern of errors was similar. The most frequent type of error made by low-functioning children as well as normal preschoolers was in place of articulation. Subsequently, 10 low-functioning children were divided into component and speech-sound training groups. The difference in these procedures was the units of behavior that served as the training stimuli. The results indicated that the speech-sound group emitted fewer errors than the component group on the posttest.

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