Effect of Similarity of Sound Substitutions on Retention Phonetic similarity of the sound to be learned and the sound which is substituted may be an important variable governing phonological acquisition. The effect of phonetic similarity was measured in a recall test involving two retention intervals—three minutes and seven days. Accordingly, the /sn/ cluster appearing in the word snow ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1972
Effect of Similarity of Sound Substitutions on Retention
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Harris Winitz
    University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri
  • Betty Bellerose
    University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1972
Effect of Similarity of Sound Substitutions on Retention
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1972, Vol. 15, 677-689. doi:10.1044/jshr.1504.677
History: Received December 22, 1970
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1972, Vol. 15, 677-689. doi:10.1044/jshr.1504.677
History: Received December 22, 1970

Phonetic similarity of the sound to be learned and the sound which is substituted may be an important variable governing phonological acquisition. The effect of phonetic similarity was measured in a recall test involving two retention intervals—three minutes and seven days. Accordingly, the /sn/ cluster appearing in the word snow was selected as the sound for which children were to make substitutions. English and non-English clusters varying in phonetic similarity to /sn/ were selected to replace /sn/. The results indicated that phonetic similarity influenced the retention of English and non-English clusters; recall showed the least decrement for those most similar to /sn/. Imitation was tested by asking subjects to imitate the substituted cluster after the seven-day recall test. For all clusters, imitation was surprisingly stable after seven days, suggesting that “motor memory” for speech sounds is highly stable over long intervals of time.

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