Spontaneous Recovery from Stuttering To investigate the puzzle of the nonpersistence of stuttering in many cases in which it begins, structured interview- and sentence-completion data were gathered on all incoming University of California, Berkeley, students during September 1964. Thirty-two spontaneously recovered stutterers were compared with 32 active stutterers and the normal controls, and a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1966
Spontaneous Recovery from Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph G. Sheehan
    University of California, Los Angeles, California
  • Margaret M. Martyn
    University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1966
Spontaneous Recovery from Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1966, Vol. 9, 121-135. doi:10.1044/jshr.0901.121
History: Received October 14, 1965
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1966, Vol. 9, 121-135. doi:10.1044/jshr.0901.121
History: Received October 14, 1965

To investigate the puzzle of the nonpersistence of stuttering in many cases in which it begins, structured interview- and sentence-completion data were gathered on all incoming University of California, Berkeley, students during September 1964. Thirty-two spontaneously recovered stutterers were compared with 32 active stutterers and the normal controls, and a computer bivariate association analysis showed: (1) four out of five recover from stuttering spontaneously; (2) fewer of those who had received public school speech therapy recovered from stuttering; (3) fewer of those who had ever been severe recovered spontaneously; (4) no familial incidence pattern with either group of stutterers as compared to controls; (5) no differences in reported handedness in stutterers or their families; (6) improvement attributed to self-acceptance and role acceptance; (7) there appear to be many different paths to recovery.

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