Nonword Repetition: A Comparison of Tests Purpose This study compared performance of children on 2 tests of nonword repetition to investigate the factors that may contribute to the well-documented nonword repetition deficit in specific language impairment (SLI). Method Twelve children with SLI age 7 to 11 years, 12 age-matched control children, and 12 control ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 2016
Nonword Repetition: A Comparison of Tests
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa M. D. Archibald
    University of Durham, Durham, United Kingdom
  • Susan E. Gathercole
    University of Durham, Durham, United Kingdom
  • Contact author: Lisa M. D. Archibald, Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada N5X 3V6. E-mail: larchiba@uwo.ca
  • Susan E. Gathercole is now at University of York, York, United Kingdom.
    Susan E. Gathercole is now at University of York, York, United Kingdom.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 2016
Nonword Repetition: A Comparison of Tests
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, November 2016, Vol. 49, 970-983. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/070)
History: Received May 12, 2005 , Revised September 8, 2005 , Accepted January 13, 2006
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, November 2016, Vol. 49, 970-983. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/070)
History: Received May 12, 2005; Revised September 8, 2005; Accepted January 13, 2006

Purpose This study compared performance of children on 2 tests of nonword repetition to investigate the factors that may contribute to the well-documented nonword repetition deficit in specific language impairment (SLI).

Method Twelve children with SLI age 7 to 11 years, 12 age-matched control children, and 12 control children matched for language ability completed 2 tests of nonword repetition: the Children’s Test of Nonword Repetition (CNRep) and the Nonword Repetition Test (NRT).

Results The children with SLI performed significantly more poorly on both tests than typically developing children of the same age. The SLI group was impaired on the CNRep but not the NRT relative to younger children with similar language abilities when adjustments were made for differences in general cognitive ability. The children with SLI repeated the lengthiest nonwords and the nonwords containing consonant clusters significantly less accurately than the control groups.

Conclusion The evidence suggests that the nonword repetition deficit in SLI may arise from a number of factors, including verbal short-term memory, lexical knowledge, and output processes.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a Bamford-Lahey Children’s Foundation Scholarship awarded to Lisa M. D. Archibald. We thank the children and staff of all of the participating schools for their cheerful cooperation.
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