Interspeaker Variation in Habitual Speaking Rate: Additional Evidence Purpose The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that talkers previously classified by Y.-C. Tsao and G. Weismer (1997)  as habitually fast versus habitually slow would show differences in the way they manipulated articulation rate across the rate continuum. Method Thirty talkers previously classified ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2006
Interspeaker Variation in Habitual Speaking Rate: Additional Evidence
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ying-Chiao Tsao
    California State University—Fullerton
  • Gary Weismer
    Waisman Center and Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin—Madison
  • Kamran Iqbal
    University of Arkansas at Little Rock
  • Contact author: Ying-Chiao Tsao, Human Communication Studies/Communicative Disorders, 800 N. State College Boulevard, P.O. Box 6868, California State University—Fullerton, Fullerton, CA 92834-6868. E-mail: ytsao@fullerton.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2006
Interspeaker Variation in Habitual Speaking Rate: Additional Evidence
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2006, Vol. 49, 1156-1164. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/083)
History: Received September 25, 2005 , Revised March 30, 2006 , Accepted March 31, 2006
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2006, Vol. 49, 1156-1164. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/083)
History: Received September 25, 2005; Revised March 30, 2006; Accepted March 31, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 16

Purpose The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that talkers previously classified by Y.-C. Tsao and G. Weismer (1997)  as habitually fast versus habitually slow would show differences in the way they manipulated articulation rate across the rate continuum.

Method Thirty talkers previously classified by Tsao and Weismer (1997)  as having habitually slow (n = 15; 7 males, 8 females) and habitually fast (n = 15; 8 males, 7 females) articulation rates produced a single sentence at 7 different rates, using a magnitude production paradigm. Hence, the participants were not randomly assigned to conditions.

Results Quadratic regression functions relating measured to intended articulation rates were all statistically significant, and most important, there were significant differences between the slow and fast groups in the y intercepts of the functions, for both males and females.

Conclusions This study provides a constructive replication of Tsao and Weismer (1997), showing a difference between slow and fast talkers with a new set of speech materials and in a new task. The findings appear to be consistent with a biological basis for intertalker rate differences.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported, in part, by Grants DC 00319 and DC03274 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, as well as by a Junior Faculty Grant from the Grants and Contracts Office at the California State University—Fullerton. We thank several individuals for their valuable input on initial drafts of the manuscript.
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