Song Recognition by Children and Adolescents With Cochlear Implants Purpose To assess song recognition and pitch perception in prelingually deaf individuals with cochlear implants (CIs). Method Fifteen hearing children (5–8 years) and 15 adults heard different versions of familiar popular songs—original (vocal + instrumental), original instrumental, and synthesized melody versions—and identified the song in a closed-set task ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2006
Song Recognition by Children and Adolescents With Cochlear Implants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tara Vongpaisal
    University of Toronto, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
  • Sandra E. Trehub
    University of Toronto, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
  • E. Glenn Schellenberg
    University of Toronto, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
  • Contact author: Sandra E. Trehub, Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5L 1C6. E-mail: sandra.trehub@utoronto.ca
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2006
Song Recognition by Children and Adolescents With Cochlear Implants
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2006, Vol. 49, 1091-1103. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/078)
History: Received September 1, 2005 , Revised December 7, 2005 , Accepted March 6, 2006
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2006, Vol. 49, 1091-1103. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/078)
History: Received September 1, 2005; Revised December 7, 2005; Accepted March 6, 2006

Purpose To assess song recognition and pitch perception in prelingually deaf individuals with cochlear implants (CIs).

Method Fifteen hearing children (5–8 years) and 15 adults heard different versions of familiar popular songs—original (vocal + instrumental), original instrumental, and synthesized melody versions—and identified the song in a closed-set task (Experiment 1). Ten CI users (8–18 years) and age-matched hearing listeners performed the same task (Experiment 2). Ten CI users (8–19 years) and 10 hearing 8-years-olds were required to detect pitch changes in repeating-tone contexts (Experiment 3). Finally, 8 CI users (6–19 years) and 13 hearing 5-year-olds were required to detect subtle pitch changes in a more challenging melodic context (Experiment 4).

Results CI users performed more poorly than hearing listeners in all conditions. They succeeded in identifying the original and instrumental versions of familiar recorded songs, and they evaluated them favorably, but they could not identify the melody versions. Although CI users could detect a 0.5-semitone change in the simple context, they failed to detect a 1-semitone change in the more difficult melodic context.

Conclusion Current implant processors provide insufficient spectral detail for some aspects of music perception, but they do not preclude young implant users' enjoyment of music.

Acknowledgments
We are grateful for the support of the Canadian Institutes for Health Research. We thank Blake Papsin and Karen Gordon from The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto for their cooperation.
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