A Comparison of Oral Structure and Oral-Motor Function in Young Males With Fragile X Syndrome and Down Syndrome This study compared the oral structure and oral-motor skills of 59 boys with fragile X syndrome (FXS), 34 boys with Down syndrome (DS), and 36 developmentally similar typically developing (TD) boys. An adaptation of the J. Robbins and T. Klee (1987)  Oral Speech Motor Protocol was administered to participants and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 14, 2016
A Comparison of Oral Structure and Oral-Motor Function in Young Males With Fragile X Syndrome and Down Syndrome
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth F. Barnes
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Joanne Roberts
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Penny Mirrett
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • John Sideris
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Jan Misenheimer
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Contact author: Elizabeth F. Barnes, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 105 Smith Level Road, CB# 8180, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8180. Email: barnes@mail.fpg.unc.edu
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 14, 2016
A Comparison of Oral Structure and Oral-Motor Function in Young Males With Fragile X Syndrome and Down Syndrome
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, November 2016, Vol. 49, 903-917. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/065)
History: Received February 2, 2005 , Revised August 8, 2005 , Accepted December 23, 2005
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, November 2016, Vol. 49, 903-917. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/065)
History: Received February 2, 2005; Revised August 8, 2005; Accepted December 23, 2005

This study compared the oral structure and oral-motor skills of 59 boys with fragile X syndrome (FXS), 34 boys with Down syndrome (DS), and 36 developmentally similar typically developing (TD) boys. An adaptation of the J. Robbins and T. Klee (1987)  Oral Speech Motor Protocol was administered to participants and their scores on measures of oral structure and accuracy on speech motor and oral-motor tasks were analyzed. Boys with FXS scored lower than TD boys on oral structure, most oral function tasks, and all speech function tasks. Boys with DS scored lower than boys with FXS and TD boys on oral structure, and lower than TD boys on 1 oral function task and all speech function tasks. Boys with FXS and TD boys scored higher on speech function than oral function tasks, while boys with DS scored higher on oral function than speech function tasks. Boys with FXS and boys with DS repeated single syllable words with greater accuracy than multiple syllable words, while the TD boys produced both types of words with equal accuracy. These results suggest that boys with FXS and boys with DS exhibit atypical oral structure and motor function, yet differ in specific oral-motor patterns.

Acknowledgments
The data used for this study were collected as part of the Carolina Communication Project, which was supported by National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Grants 1 R01 HD38819, 1 R01 HD044935, and 1 R03 HD40640 and by Grant T32-HD40127 awarded to Elizabeth Hennon.
We wish to thank all the children and families who participated in this study. We greatly appreciate the assistance of the Carolina Communication Project staff, including Kathleen Anderson, Anne Edwards, Elizabeth Hennon, Julia Jurgens, Lauren Moskowitz, and Kathleen Neff. We also appreciate the editorial assistance of Jay Riski and Steve Long.
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