Perception of Coarticulatory Information in Normal Speech and Dysarthria Purpose This study addressed three research questions: (a) Can listeners use anticipatory vowel information in prevocalic consonants produced by talkers with dysarthria to identify the upcoming vowel? (b) Are listeners sensitive to interspeaker variation in anticipatory coarticulation during prevocalic consonants produced by healthy talkers and/or talkers with dysarthria, as measured ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 14, 2016
Perception of Coarticulatory Information in Normal Speech and Dysarthria
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kris Tjaden
    University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY
  • Joan Sussman
    University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY
  • Contact author: Kris Tjaden, Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences, University at Buffalo, 122 Cary Hall, 3435 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214. tjaden@acsu.buffalo.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 14, 2016
Perception of Coarticulatory Information in Normal Speech and Dysarthria
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, November 2016, Vol. 49, 888-902. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/064)
History: Received October 25, 2004 , Revised March 31, 2005 , Accepted December 15, 2005
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, November 2016, Vol. 49, 888-902. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/064)
History: Received October 25, 2004; Revised March 31, 2005; Accepted December 15, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

Purpose This study addressed three research questions: (a) Can listeners use anticipatory vowel information in prevocalic consonants produced by talkers with dysarthria to identify the upcoming vowel? (b) Are listeners sensitive to interspeaker variation in anticipatory coarticulation during prevocalic consonants produced by healthy talkers and/or talkers with dysarthria, as measured by vowel identification accuracy? (c) Is interspeaker variation in anticipatory coarticulation reflected in measures of intelligibility?

Method Stimuli included 106 CVC words produced by 20 speakers with either Parkinson’s disease or multiple sclerosis or by 16 healthy controls characterized by an operationally defined normal, under, or over level of anticipatory vowel coarticulation. Ten listeners were presented with prevocalic consonants for identification of the vowel. Ten additional listeners judged single-word intelligibility. An analysis of variance was used to determine differences in vowel identification accuracy and intelligibility as a function of speaker group, coarticulation level, and vowel type.

Results Listeners accurately identified vowels produced by all speaker groups from the aperiodic portion of prevocalic consonants, but interspeaker variations in strength of coarticulation did not strongly affect vowel identification accuracy or intelligibility.

Conclusions Listeners appear to be tuned to similar types of information in the acoustic speech stream irrespective of the source or speaker, and any perceptual effects of interspeaker variation in coarticulation are subtle.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this study were presented at the Fall 2003 and Spring 2004 Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America. Many thanks to members of the Speech Editoral group for their patience and constructive comments during the review process. Research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Diseases Grant R01 DC04689.
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