Correction of the Peripheral Spatiotemporal Response Pattern: A Potential New Signal-Processing Strategy The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new signal-processing strategy, spatiotemporal pattern correction (SPC), that is based on our knowledge of the level-dependent temporal response properties of auditory nerve fibers in normal and impaired ears. In normal-hearing listeners, tuning is sharp for low-level inputs and broadens as input ... Research Note
Research Note  |   August 01, 2006
Correction of the Peripheral Spatiotemporal Response Pattern: A Potential New Signal-Processing Strategy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lu-Feng Shi
    Institute for Sensory Research, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY
  • Laurel H. Carney
    Institute for Sensory Research, Department of Bioengineering and Neuroscience, Syracuse University
  • Karen A. Doherty
    Institute for Sensory Research, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Syracuse University
  • Contact author: Karen A. Doherty, 805 South Crouse Avenue, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244. E-mail: kadohert@syr.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Note
Research Note   |   August 01, 2006
Correction of the Peripheral Spatiotemporal Response Pattern: A Potential New Signal-Processing Strategy
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2006, Vol. 49, 848-855. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/060)
History: Received October 5, 2005 , Accepted January 5, 2006
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2006, Vol. 49, 848-855. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/060)
History: Received October 5, 2005; Accepted January 5, 2006

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new signal-processing strategy, spatiotemporal pattern correction (SPC), that is based on our knowledge of the level-dependent temporal response properties of auditory nerve fibers in normal and impaired ears. In normal-hearing listeners, tuning is sharp for low-level inputs and broadens as input level increases. When peripheral filters change their shape with input level, the phase properties of the filters and the latency of the filter’s response also change. However, in listeners with hearing loss, tuning is broad for both low- and high-level inputs. Thus, there is little change in the phase properties of the filters for different input levels. The SPC strategy manipulates the temporal aspects of different frequency channels of sounds in an attempt to “correct” for this abnormal spatiotemporal response pattern of the impaired ear. Quality judgments and intelligibility measures of speech processed at various SPC strengths were obtained from a small group of normal-hearing listeners and listeners with hearing loss. In general, listeners with hearing loss preferred sentences with some degree of SPC processing, whereas normal-hearing listeners preferred unprocessed sentences. Benefit from SPC on the nonsense syllable test varied greatly across phonemes and listeners. A more comprehensive study of listeners with different degrees and configurations of hearing loss is needed to determine the amount of SPC benefit.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Grant R21 DC006057 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. We would like to thank Michael Anzalone for his great help in programming and stimulus preparation. We would also like to thank Lauren Calandruccio for her effort in collecting part of the data in Experiment 1 as well as for her help in preparing Figures 2 and 3. Portions of this work were presented at the 2004 American Auditory Society meeting in Scottsdale, AZ, and at the 147th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in New York.
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