Using Preference-Based Measures to Assess Quality of Life in Stuttering Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether standard pharmaco-economic preference methods can be used to assess perceived quality of life in stuttering. Method Seventy-five nonstuttering adults completed a standardized face-to-face interview that included a rating scale, standard gamble, and time trade-off preference measures for 4 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2006
Using Preference-Based Measures to Assess Quality of Life in Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robin E. Bramlett
    University of Georgia, Athens
  • Anne K. Bothe
    University of Georgia, Athens
  • Duska M. Franic
    University of Georgia, Athens
  • Contact author: Robin E. Bramlett, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 516 Aderhold Hall, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7153. Email: bramletr@uga.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2006
Using Preference-Based Measures to Assess Quality of Life in Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2006, Vol. 49, 381-394. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/030)
History: Received April 13, 2005 , Accepted August 5, 2005
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2006, Vol. 49, 381-394. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/030)
History: Received April 13, 2005; Accepted August 5, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 14

Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether standard pharmaco-economic preference methods can be used to assess perceived quality of life in stuttering.

Method Seventy-five nonstuttering adults completed a standardized face-to-face interview that included a rating scale, standard gamble, and time trade-off preference measures for 4 health states (your health and mild, moderate, and severe stuttering) in the context of 2 anchor states (perfect health and death).

Results Results showed mean utility values between .443 for severe stuttering estimated using the rating scale technique and .982 for respondents' own current health estimated using a standard gamble technique. A two-way repeated measures analysis of variance and post hoc tests showed significant effects for method, health state, and the interaction.

Conclusions These results confirm that utility estimates can differentiate between stuttering severity levels and that utility scores for stuttering conform to the known properties of data obtained using these standard measurement techniques. These techniques, therefore, can and should be further investigated as potential contributors to complete measurement protocols for the study and treatment of stuttering.

Acknowledgments
A preliminary version of these data was presented at the annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Chicago, November 2003.
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