Visuospatial Immediate Memory in Specific Language Impairment Purpose Investigations of the cognitive processes underlying specific language impairment (SLI) have implicated deficits in verbal short-term and working memory and in particular the storage and processing of phonological information. This study investigated short-term and working memory for visuospatial material for a group of children with SLI, to test whether ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 14, 2016
Visuospatial Immediate Memory in Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa M. D. Archibald
    University of Durham, Durham, United Kingdom
  • Susan E. Gathercole
    University of Durham, Durham, United Kingdom
  • Contact author: Lisa M. D. Archibald, Department of Psychology, Science Laboratories, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, United Kingdom. Email: l.m.archibald@durham.ac.uk
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 14, 2016
Visuospatial Immediate Memory in Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, November 2016, Vol. 49, 265-277. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/022)
History: Received March 1, 2005 , Revised June 18, 2005 , Accepted October 5, 2005
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, November 2016, Vol. 49, 265-277. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/022)
History: Received March 1, 2005; Revised June 18, 2005; Accepted October 5, 2005

Purpose Investigations of the cognitive processes underlying specific language impairment (SLI) have implicated deficits in verbal short-term and working memory and in particular the storage and processing of phonological information. This study investigated short-term and working memory for visuospatial material for a group of children with SLI, to test whether the verbal memory impairments already established extend to the visuospatial domain.

Method Fifteen children with SLI and control groups of children matched on chronological age and language age completed tests of visuospatial short-term and working memory.

Results The SLI group performed comparably with age-matched control children on all measures and at a higher level than the language-age control group on several measures.

Conclusions The visuospatial short-term and working memory abilities were at age-appropriate levels in this SLI group. This contrasts markedly with their impairments on tests of verbal short-term and working memory.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a Bamford–Lahey Children’s Foundation Scholarship, awarded to Lisa M. D. Archibald. We thank the children and staff of all the schools for their cheerful cooperation.
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