Automatic Measurement of Nonparticipatory Stiffness in the Perioral Complex Purpose To detail a novel automated technology developed in the authors' laboratory to quantitatively and noninvasively measure perioral passive stiffness in order to consider the feasibility of future applications in patients with facial movement disorders. Method A stiffness measurement system was developed, with corresponding data sampled from a ... Research Note
Research Note  |   October 01, 2007
Automatic Measurement of Nonparticipatory Stiffness in the Perioral Complex
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lana M. Seibel
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Steven M. Barlow
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Contact author: Steven M. Barlow, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing: Sciences and Disorders, University of Kansas, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Room 3001, Lawrence, KS 66045-7555. E-mail: smbarlow@ku.edu.
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Older Adults & Aging / Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Note
Research Note   |   October 01, 2007
Automatic Measurement of Nonparticipatory Stiffness in the Perioral Complex
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2007, Vol. 50, 1272-1279. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/089)
History: Received October 3, 2006 , Accepted April 3, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2007, Vol. 50, 1272-1279. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/089)
History: Received October 3, 2006; Accepted April 3, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose To detail a novel automated technology developed in the authors' laboratory to quantitatively and noninvasively measure perioral passive stiffness in order to consider the feasibility of future applications in patients with facial movement disorders.

Method A stiffness measurement system was developed, with corresponding data sampled from a group of 8 healthy women. Perioral electromyograms were sampled to confirm nonparticipation. A specially designed linear motor servo operating under position feedback was programmed to impose sequential step displacements of the lip at the oral angles over a span of approximately 24 mm. Real-time data acquisition and analysis of resultant force and displacement provide a quantitative, rapid, index of muscle rigidity (stiffness) during a do-not-contract condition.

Results Nonlinear regression techniques revealed that the relation between perioral stiffness and imposed displacement was highly significant.

Conclusion Given the probable relation between certain forms of neuromotor disease and facial rigidity, effects of bomb blast or missile injury on orofacial function, or stiffness changes due to tissue scarring after lip revision surgeries in children with clefts, it is likely that inclusion of facial stiffness measurements will be useful in the management of facial movement disorders.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by Grant KU RDF 195 from the University of Kansas, Grant 38457X from the Sutherland Foundation, and Grant P30 DC005803 from the National Institutes of Health. Special thanks go to Shiva Prasad, Atulya Deekonda, Lalit Venkatesan, and Douglas Kieweg for assistance in digital signal processing.
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